Modeling Success

Posted by chucktrautman on October 18, 2018

If you could become the best golfer in the world simply by watching videos of Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Arnold Palmer, how much money and time would you invest to get your hands on those videos – knowing that after watching them you’d be able to replicate everything you saw?

My guess is you – or someone you know – would spend a lot of money on these because now you’d have the ability to make millions of dollars a year, playing a game in some of the most gorgeous spots on earth.

The problem is, it’s not this simple when it comes to sports or physical ability.

HOWEVER…

When it comes to being able to duplicate success in business, it is that easy.

You can simply find models and then follow them. You’ll need to invest time and/or money to get these models, but they are there for the taking.

You also have the unique ability to take parts from several successful systems in order to build your own successful composite model.

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This is an excerpt from my book, “9 Rules For Business Prosperity in the New Economy”.  The book may be purchased in both printed and Kindle editions at: http://arizonamarketingassociation.org/9-rules-business-prosperity/

Delegation

Posted by chucktrautman on October 11, 2018

In order to be able to manage your time to get things done that are important to you, you must first preserve some time to manage by getting your team members to get the things done that should be important to them.

This requires you to pass on responsibility to others in such a way that they understand, accept and are motivated to complete the work. This is the toughest part of management for most people. Very few people do it well.

There are a number of factors that influence the relationship between the manager and given employee that will affect the outcome of the delegated work – including personality styles, the overall work environment etc. – which can be covered in a short discussion.

However there are two certainties about delegating work:

1. The effort will fail if the individual lacks a full understanding of what is to be done

2. The effort will fail if a procedure is not in place and understood for checking work

Here then are seven questions to ask yourself to ensure the individual understands the assignment and that its completion will be checked:

  • What is to be done?
  • Why does it need to be done?
  • Who is to do it?
  • When is it to be done by?
  • When is the doer to report on progress?
  • How is the doer to report?
  • What will constitute and verify successful completion – what are the desired results?

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This is an excerpt from my book, “9 Rules For Business Prosperity in the New Economy”.  The book may be purchased in both printed and Kindle editions at: http://arizonamarketingassociation.org/9-rules-business-prosperity/

Don’t permit commoditization of yourself or services

Posted by chucktrautman on October 4, 2018

This is a fundamental power issue. If you are or feel commoditized, hustle and fix it.

Reinvent; alter your marketing; work like a fiend to put (perception of) supply versus demand, specialist versus generalist to work for you rather than against you.

Successful entrepreneurs do NOT operate from fear.

That’s not really because they are fearless; but because they’ve created a set of circumstances for themselves that makes it easy to be fearless.

1. Operating without targets

Successful entrepreneurs use a lot of benchmarks, numbers, statistics, goals to hold themselves and others accountable, daily, weekly monthly, yearly, per project, per function.

2. Working in unproductive environments

Successful entrepreneurs are able to produce good results under adverse conditions – but strive not to be in that position very often.

Whether at home, in the place of business, traveling, wherever, whatever, they exert control over their environment, and give themselves every advantage to support productivity.

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This is an excerpt from my book, “9 Rules For Business Prosperity in the New Economy”.  The book may be purchased in both printed and Kindle editions at: http://arizonamarketingassociation.org/9-rules-business-prosperity/

Tolerating “time vampires” and others who waste your time

Posted by chucktrautman on September 27, 2018

Successful entrepreneurs have very low tolerance for those who habitually waste time and disrupt productivity.

I suggest “three strikes and you’re out”.

Employee, vendor, even client: Explain why their behavior is incompatible with the way you work and/or interfering with your productivity and describe the substitute behavior desired.

Sit the vampire down for that talk three times.

Say: “Strike One, Strike Two, Strike Three – and you’re out. Next!”

If you have vampires sucking your time now, make the list. Plan the talk to have with them on a 3 x 5 card with their name on it.

Go play baseball.

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This is an excerpt from my book, “9 Rules For Business Prosperity in the New Economy”.  The book may be purchased in both printed and Kindle editions at: http://arizonamarketingassociation.org/9-rules-business-prosperity/

It is hard to waste time when there is no time to be wasted

Posted by chucktrautman on September 20, 2018

Consider the simple matter of phone calls – if a person engages in an average of four a day over 250 workdays, that’s 1,000 in a year.

If, on average, they consume just 3 minutes more each day than you would have through tightly controlled end times and scripted days, that’s roughly one whole week wasted – thus shortening your year to 51 weeks. In 10 years, that’s 500 hours.

The same math would apply to time given to social media or repeatedly negotiating with an employee over his repetitive bad behavior.

In summary, here are some of the key lessons from the way exceptionally productive people work:

  • Accepting that no-one can manage time itself
  • Learning from the three things that productive people do
  • Recognizing the importance of identifying and focusing on five or fewer critical success factors
  • Refusing to be spread so thin you have no impact
  • Knowing that what you choose not to do is at least as important as what you do
  • Applying financial accountability

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This is an excerpt from my book, “9 Rules For Business Prosperity in the New Economy”.  The book may be purchased in both printed and Kindle editions at: http://arizonamarketingassociation.org/9-rules-business-prosperity/